Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Dunwoody Police will start using the social media site Nextdoor - register today.

https://nextdoor.com/invite/xhtjbkxffxgyyqudsgkp


At a conference I attended last week I heard several good stories of the social media site Nextdoor and now the Dunwoody Police Department has announced that they will start using it too.  The registration process forces you to register your home address and then they verify that you actually live at that address and make you a trusted member of the community. 

I am guessing the Dunwoody PD will be using it for pin point informational pushes whereby if there is something specific happening is a specific area they can notify the affected community homeowners without putting it out on other social media sites for all to see.

As you can see the borders of the community that I am registered in, creep just outside the official City of Dunwoody borders but I am guessing those might change.

So far I like what I see of the service and recommend that you check it out for yourself.

Thanks,   John

Do not miss event - Dads' Bucket List "Checklist Challenge" at Brook Run Park in Dunwoody on Sat Oct 25th !

What's On Tap for Oct. 25th


We're approaching event day and we wanted to communicate some of the latest news with you. 

Teamwork: It's going to be your key to success this time around. One of the new wrinkles for this event will be that several obstacles will have an option to compete against other teams.  Consider it an opportunity to show that brains can outwit brawn or perhaps show how your team's brawn is able to outlast another's beauty.  Got some co-workers, neighbors or friends that you'd like to see your team match up against?

Obstacles: We're always looking to mix things up so get ready to see several new obstacles (and of course, a return of some of our most popular ones).

Buffs and Waffles!:  We're excited to announce that every attendee will receive his/her own custom Dads' Bucket List buff just like they wear on Survivor. We're also partnering with our friends at Waffle House to provide waffles until they run out.

Registration: It's time to stop dipping that toe in the water and commit to signing up for our Oct. 25 "Checklist Challenge" in Dunwoody (Brook Run Park), click here to register today.

Charity - This event supports Bert's Big Adventure in making a difference in the lives of children with chronic and terminal illnesses.
We hope you'll join us in October, and please help us by spreading the word to your friends and colleagues.

Go. See. Be. Do.

Dads' Bucket List
http://www.dadsbucketlist.com

Do you know what Abraham Baldwin and William Few did for you? Happy Constitution Day.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Today the United States celebrates Constitution Day and it is a good reminder for us to examine the document that binds us.  In fact Federal Law states that all publicly funded educational institutions, and all federal agencies, provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day.

Take a minute to read the Constitution, the Amendments or learn of our Founding Fathers.

On September 17, 1787, the thirty-nine delegates to the Constitutional Convention met for the last time to sign the document they had created. Two of whom represented the Colony of Georgia and their stories are documented below.

Abraham Baldwin, Georgia
Abraham Baldwin, Georgia
Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754 – March 4, 1807), a Democratic Republican was born in Guildford, Connecticut and was one of twelve children by his father, a blacksmith, who married twice. Mr. Baldwin’s father took on substantial debt to ensure that his children received a proper education. Proof positive of that was Baldwin’s half brother Henry who achieved a position as an Associate Justice for the United States Supreme Court.    Read more on Abraham Baldwin.


William Few, Georgia
William Few, Georgia
A United States Founding Father, William Few, Jr, was born on June 10, 1748. As an American Politician, Few was apparently born into a deprived yeoman farming family, but when Few grew up, he gained a successful career in politics and as a socialite. It appeared that Few had inherited his outstanding ability in both organization and leadership. Both of these were proven by his prominent involvement in the Revolutionary War. His ability in military operations, organization and leadership was applied in the battle against the British invaders. His expertise in military and devotion to the common good caught the attention of the Patriot cause leaders and allowed him access to vital political responsibilities.  Read more on William Few.

Kingswood Consignment Sale starts Thursday

Kingswood Consignment
Sale


Sale starts tomorrow, Thursday, September 18!

Incredible bargains on everything for babies & children from over 200 sellers!

  • Fall and winter clothing, shoes, and accessories, including a large selection for "tweens" -- girls size 12 - 16 and boys size 14 - 18!
  • Ski wear -- bibs, pants, jackets
  • Baby equipment, bedding, room décor
  • Books, games, toys, movies, music, software, video games
  • Bikes, trikes, scooters, skates, athletic gear
When:
Thursday, September 18, 5 pm – 9 pm (no children under 10, please)
       Friday, September 19, 9 am – 2 pm
            Saturday, September 20, 8 am – 1 pm
(many items 1/2 price!)

P.S.  To be among the first to shop, sign up for a 4-hour volunteer shift and you can shop the PRESALE on Thursday at 3 pm!  Just go to our SignUp Genius site to sign up:

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/20f0f45a9ae2fa02-kidstuff6
Where:
Kingswood United Methodist Church
5015 Tilly Mill Road, Dunwoody, GA  30338
      (corner of Tilly Mill Rd. and North Peachtree Road)
Community Life Center Gymnasium
      (Use North Peachtree Road entrance)
 
For more information:

www.kingswoodumc.org/kidstuff
 

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Friday, September 12, 2014

Atlanta Press Club presents 30 history lessons for us Yankees who ain't from around here.


As part of the Atlanta Press Club's 50th anniversary celebrations, they are searching for Atlanta's favorite news stories over the past 50 years. Throughout the summer, people submitted their favorite news stories from the Atlanta area, which were narrowed down by a panel of Atlanta Press Club members.

My wife Kristin and I moved to Dunwoody in 1996 from Chicago, therefore we personally missed much of this history but I thought the articles were interesting enough to share, though they somehow missed one of my favorites.

1964 – 1969
Who’s Out of Step in Atlanta (1964) By Eugene Patterson for The Atlanta Constitution
Eugene Patterson’s work won the Pulitzer Prize and drew widespread attention to the Civil Rights Movement as it played out locally, statewide and nationally. This is one such column urging restaurant owners to desegregate their establishments.

Nobel Prize Reminds Us (1964) By Ralph McGill for The Atlanta Constitution
This story represents the power of Ralph McGill, Pulitzer Prize-winning editor and publisher of The Atlanta Constitution. In this piece, McGill issues a call that still resonates today about personal choice, respect and Atlanta’s legacy. 

1970 – 1979
Maid in Atlanta (1971) by Anne Siddons for Atlanta Magazine
Long before best-selling book The Help, Siddons examined the real lives of Buckhead’s domestic workers. Siddons went on to become a bestselling author, writing Downtown about her early years with Atlanta magazine.

Police Cheating Scandal (1977) by Richard Belcher for Fox5 Atlanta
In what became one of Atlanta’s biggest news events of the late 1970s, WAGA-TV reporter Richard Belcher and producer Michael Carlin broke the story of four black officers accusing Police Commissioner Reginald Eaves of orchestrating cheating on promotional exams. 

Underpaid in America (1979) by Paul Lieberman and Chester Goolrick for The Atlanta Constitution
This series, which focuses on the minimum wage and the related issue of immigration, speaks powerfully to the growing gap between economic strata in Georgia and beyond. 

1980 – 1989
They’re Killing Our Children (1981) by Boyd Lewis for WABE
Boyd Lewis brought tragedy to light. This report recognized a frightening pattern: the unsolved murders of 20 black children, and demonstrated the overwhelming fear it brought upon Atlanta’s African-American community and their desperation for justice. 

Best Minor League Team in History (1985) by Ted Rubenstein for Southwind later airing on WABE
For more than 60 years, The Atlanta Crackers were the most beloved and winningest team in Atlanta. This nostalgic story transcends the years to celebrate Atlanta’s history and its love of baseball. 

The Color of Money (1988) by Bill Dedman for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
This is a powerful and exhaustively reported four-day series of more than 20 stories demonstrating that banks rarely offered credit in Atlanta’s middle income black and integrated neighborhoods. The series and its conclusions are fundamentally data-based and explore every aspect of redlining in Atlanta.

Taping of Lawyer-Client Conversations Page 1 and Page 2 (1989) by Trisha Renaud for Fulton County Daily Report
Our criminal justice system depends on lawyers being able to speak to their clients in confidence. But in 1989, Trisha Renaud uncovered a story about the Douglas County jail, where officials of the sheriff’s department were regularly listening in on lawyer-client conversations.

When AIDS Comes Home (1989) by Steve Sternberg and Michael Schwarz for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“When AIDS Comes Home” was the culmination of 18 months of reporting and photography by Steve Sternberg and Michael Schwarz. The story focused on 33-year-old Tom Fox of Atlanta and the battle he waged against AIDS with the support of his family and a community of friends who were also infected with the virus — all of them determined to pack a lifetime into a few months of borrowed time. 

1990 – 1999
Inside The Southern Co.: Discord, Deception, Death (1991) by Rex Smith and Emory Thomas for Atlanta Business Chronicle
This piece dives into one of the South’s most influential and secretive economic engines. The picture it presents serves as cautionary tale for those who would take the machinations of Southern Company lightly.  

Death of a Newspaper Page 1Page 2, Page 3Page 4Page 5Page 6Page 7Page 8Page 9 (1992) by Ed Bean for Georgia Trend Magazine 
The most important development on the Atlanta journalism scene in the 1990s was the New York Times Co.’s bold decision to challenge Cox Enterprises for supremacy in the northern suburbs. The resulting battle between the Times-owned Gwinnett Daily News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution resulted in what likely was the South’s last great newspaper war. Bean’s 1992 article looks at how the war was waged and why the New York Times Co. ultimately walked away from its ambitious expansion plans in Atlanta.

Failing the Children (1992) by Michael Hinkelman and Emory Thomas Jr for Atlanta Business Chronicle
This piece seems to touch on just about every aspect of Atlanta Public School’s failures, including board governance, construction, food service and teacher dismissals. It also includes a critical look at business community’s failure to truly commit to the school system.

Good Money After Bad (1994) by Julie Hairston and Michael Hinkelman for Atlanta Business Chronicle
This is a comprehensive review of mismanagement and corruption at the Atlanta Housing Authority. This piece was instrumental in creating a clean slate for the arrival of Renee Glover, who would become the next Atlanta Housing Authority CEO.

Used To Being Boss, Ted Turner is Mulling His Time Warner Role (1995) by Anita Sharpe for The Wall Street Journal
This piece explained the details behind the merge of Turner Broadcasting into Time Warner Inc. The piece ponders Ted Turner’s diminished role, the industry and the strategic imperatives behind the merger.

The Damage That Naming a Suspect Does to the Innocent (1996) by Ann Woolner for Daily Report
On July 30, 1996, the media descended on Richard Jewell, the security guard at Centennial Olympic Park hailed for discovering a bomb, then suspected of planting it. That week Ann Woolner wondered whether Jewel might be innocent. Attached is her resulting opinion column.

East Lake Golf Club (1997) by Jimmy Roberts for ABC Sports
This is the story of how East Lake Golf Club was turned from an urban disaster into a nationally recognized jewel. It reports how a city and a developer changed a dark nest of crime and poverty into a beacon of hope and opportunity. 

Georgia’s Forgotten Children (1999) by Jane Hansen for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
The impact of this story continues to resonate 15 years later as the state grapples with a child welfare system that has proved invulnerable to reform efforts.  The debate these stories fuelled and the problems they revealed make them a milestone in Georgia journalism. 

2000 – 2010
Exec Finding Light After Dark Days (2000) by Maria Saporta for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Back in 2000, depression among CEOs was never discussed or even acknowledged. In a ground-breaking move, Larry Gellerstedt III – in a story that took about six months to come together – was willing to talk about his intense struggles with depression. The story helped to remove the stigma of depression in corporate circles and make it more acceptable for CEOs to seek help for mental illness.

Killing Arc A ‘Bitter Pill’ for Barnes Part 1Part 2Part 3 and Part 4 (2002) by Sarah Rubenstein and Walter Woods for Atlanta Business Chronicle
These four stories on the Northern Arc, a $2.2 billion road that was meant to be former Governor Roy Barnes’ legacy to Georgia, reveal serious ethics questions about the Barnes administration and a number of other state officials. The articles become a factor in Barnes failed reelection bid. 

Well Known, Well Made and Well Liked: The Story of Atlantic Steel (2005) by Kate Sweeney for WABE
Atlantic Station is a modern mixed-use district with shops, townhouses, office buildings and park space. Yet for nearly a century, the land that makes up this modern neighborhood was the site of a different kind of city landmark: Atlantic Steel. WABE’s Kate Sweeney spoke with six former employees of Atlantic Steel and its union about what it was like both to work there and to experience its demise.

The Talented Dr. Krist (2006) by Steve Fenessy for Atlanta Magazine
This piece follows a man convicted of kidnapping and burying an Emory student alive, as he manages to reinvent himself as a small-town doctor. The piece was selected for the 2007 edition of the Best American Crime Writing.  

Coretta Scott King: Reserved But Never Reticent (2006) by Cynthia Tucker for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
This column presents a rare unguarded glimpse of one of The South’s most treasured women: Coretta Scott King. 

Why Is Genarlow Wilson In Prison? (2006) by Chandra Thomas Whitfield for Atlanta Magazine
This is a story of race, of conscience, of community, of unlimited resources and of a mother’s love. It lays out events and the law clearly without being sensational. 

“You Have Thousands of Angels Around You” (2007) by Paige Williams for Atlanta Magazine
This article shares the tale of an orphaned teenage refugee from Burundi and the Atlanta family and community who gave her a second chance in life. 

Cheating our Children: Surge in CRCT Results Raises ‘Big Red Flag’ (2008) by John Perry and Heather Vogell for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reignited the national debate over standardized test scores as the primary measure of improving public schools when its reporting led to an investigation which found that 44 out of 56 Atlanta schools cheated on the 2009 CRCT. 

The Fall of House Speaker Glenn Richardson (2009) by Dale Russell for Fox5 Atlanta
It was the story that led to the resignation of Georgia’s second most powerful public official, a total shake-up in Georgia’s legislative leadership, and the promise of strong ethics reform throughout the state.
 
2010 – Present
Around the Clock at Waffle House (2010) by Besha Rodell for Creative Loafing
This is a feature on one of Atlanta’s favorite establishments. The article paints a vibrant picture of a day inside the Waffle House on Cheshire Bridge Road.

The Other 284 Days
 by Rebecca Burns (2013) for Atlanta Magazine

This story paints a gritty, yet empathetic, picture of the stark contrast between Turner Field, Home of the Atlanta Braves, and the impoverished and neglected neighborhood that surrounds it.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

GA Secretary of State releases iPhone App for Voter Registration.


The official voter registration app brought to you by the Georgia Office of the Secretary of State. GA Votes allows Georgia citizens to register to vote online (OLVR ) and access their voter information through a mobile friendly version of the classic My Voter Page (MVP).

GA Votes by PCC Technology Group, LLC



Features:
Online voter registration and address or name updates (requires valid GA Driver’s License or ID).
Electronically submits your voter registration to local county election officials.
Polling place directions via your favorite maps app.
E-mails a copy of your voter registration request.

If you do not have a valid GA Driver’s License or ID, visit www.sos.ga.gov/elections and click “Register to Vote” to access a fillable voter registration form that you can print and mail to your county elections office. It’s that easy!

Use MVP to view your voter information, elections information, sample ballots, polling place directions and early voting locations. Simply enter your first initial, last name, date of birth and county of registration.

Questions? Contact your county elections office or the Georgia Office of the Secretary of State Elections Division.

Dunwoody's MJCCA Announces Book Festival Line-Up for November.


23rd Edition of the Book Festival of the MJCCA Announces
Complete Author Line-Up
November 1 – 19, 2014

Presented by Greenberg Traurig and Wells Fargo Bank
View Complete Author Lineup Here
Tickets On Sale Now!

Photo Links to Featured Authors:


40+ Authors; Two Epic Weeks… Mark your calendars for one of our community’s most anticipated cultural events, the 23rd Edition of the Book Festival of the MJCCA, November 1 – 19, 2014. The Festival will feature works from this year’s most sought-after and talked-about authors, celebrities, and influencers. More than 10,000 visitors will enjoy engaging speaker programs, author meet-and-greets, book signings, panel discussions, The Family Reading Festival, the Esther G. Levine Community Read, The Eva and George Stern Lecture, and more. Most events will be held at the Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta (MJCCA), 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Dunwoody. Purchase tickets: call 678.812.4005 or visit online at www.atlantajcc.org/bookfestival


Dunwoody Girls Volleyball car wash this Saturday at Burger King